Judy LaDeur: Why Some Teams Fail

Read this sampling of the top coach’s insights on building a team. Then register for the Ultimate RE/MAX Teams Event – Dec. 8 in Las Vegas – to hear many more!

By Heather R. Johnson

November 2015

judy LaDeurJudy LaDeur knows her stuff. The in-demand coach pulls from a successful real estate sales career and her expertise in developing recruiting and training systems to help other real estate professionals succeed, too.

This December, LaDeur – along with Tom Ferry, David Scott and Travis Robertson – will present top strategies for developing powerhouse teams at the Ultimate RE/MAX Teams Event – a one-day super session Dec. 8 at the Mirage Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. Register now.

Here’s a sampling of the types of valuable insights LaDeur will share.

4 Reasons Why Some Teams Fail

1. The wrong mix of personalities

Two types of agents that really love being on a team are the amiable and the analytical agent. Both are security-oriented. The amiable personality – the support person – gets their joy and satisfaction from doing their job really well and making the Team Leader look good. The analytical agent is detail oriented and systemized. If the Team Leader shows appreciation in an appropriate manner, analytical agents will stay for years.

2. Controlling rather than guiding

Many Leam Leaders are ‘driver’ personalities. They enjoy the chase, but not the paperwork and follow-up. A driver team leader may look for someone whose activities they can control versus hiring the right person for the task. For example, the driver may hire the amiable personality without understanding how best to work with that personality. Drivers tend to throw things (figuratively) at their team members. The amiable person doesn’t respond well to that. They need direction and structure. If you hire people according to their natural abilities, and understand how to manage them, you’re going to have a better end results.

3. A hyperfocus on “me”

A Team Leader’s role is similar to that of a Broker, whose job revolves around recruiting and retaining agents, and increasing their production. Team Leaders don’t always approach the table like that. When you approach the lead position from a ‘me’ standpoint, the team won’t be as productive. Give your team members what they need to succeed, and they’ll make sure you look good.

4. Missing opportunities to expand with the best

Team Leaders have a lot of cross sales with agents in the marketplace. Pay close attention to the people you work with to close transactions. If you like the way someone’s done the job, send that agent a thank-you note after the sale and ultimately recommend that he or she join your team. Those agents might be looking for the security that a team offers.

You can read the original article here.